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Oxy-hemodynamic effects during positioning of patients with myocardial acute infarction: a clinical trial

Lucelia silva Barros, Monyque Silva, Fernanda Reis, Ana Carolina Jeronymo, Mariana Martins, Dalmo Valerio Machado

Abstract


Aim: To analyze the effects of oxygen consumption and myocardial contractility during positioning in bed for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared to non-cardiac hospitalized individuals. Method: clinical trial, controlled, randomized, parallel, blind. Randomization: position order in different decubiti; sizing: finite populations based on the prevalence of AMI, totaling 30 heart attack patients; Controls: hospitalized individuals matched for age and sex with blood pressure of less than 50 mm/Hg. Inclusion criteria for heart patients: Killip class I and II, up to 72 hours after the event. Data processing: SPSS®; statistical analysis: mean, mode, median; variance, standard deviation and coefficient of variation, Pearson coefficient, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals and ANOVA. 5% significance level. Preliminary results: significant difference (p=0.04) was found after comparing the cardiac index between decubitus positions. The left lateral position presented the smallest score.


Keywords


Posicionamento; Hemodinâmica; Infarto agudo do miocárdio

References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.17665/1676-4285.20155283